Class: The Noble Eightfold Path - Putting the Buddha's Path to Happiness Into Practice, Fall 2018 (8 Wks)

 

Please join Christine and Gregory for an 8-week class in which we will explore each fold of the Eightfold Path and its application to daily life, through: Dharma talks, group
discussion, weekly reflections, and group meditation. To orient us on this journey, we will also be reading the book, "Eight Mindful Steps to Happiness" by Bhante Gunaratana.

The Noble Eightfold Path is the fourth of the Buddha's Four Noble Truths and is described by the Buddha as the way to the cessation of suffering and the blossoming of self-awakening. The Eightfold Path is often said to contain a summary of all the instructions and essential elements of the path to realization.

ABOUT THE TEACHERS
Gregory Maloof:
Gregory is an assistant Dharma teacher to Robert Beatty at Portland Insight Meditation Community. As a mindfulness-based therapist with a master’s degree in marriage, couples and family counseling and a bachelor’s degree in western philosophy, Gregory draws inspiration from both western and eastern paradigms in his approach to understanding and sharing the Dharma. Gregory has 20 years of meditation experience, having studied in the traditions of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, U Ba Khin and Ven. Pa Auk Sayadaw and has also been heavily influenced and inspired by various teachers in the Thai Forest Tradition. When not on a meditation cushion, Gregory enjoys movies, racquetball, writing screenplays with his wife, and eating anything wrapped in a tortilla.

Christine Gieben:
Christine came to Dharma practice after years of interest in psychology and human interaction. After completing her degree in Clinical Psychology in 2001, she was drawn to explore the teachings of the Buddha and how these fit with western psychological concepts. She was introduced to the Dharma in January of 2003 while attending a weekend retreat with Robert Beatty. This retreat changed how she experienced life in a very profound way and she began a regular sitting practice and comprehensive study of the Dharma.

Christine has has studied mainly under Robert Beatty and Matt Flickstein and as such, has had influences from both traditional Buddhist and non-dual teachings. She has attended retreats of various lengths and has enjoyed assisting Robert on some of his retreats. Christine attributes most of her growth and increased happiness to Dharma practice, and over the course of time, has found herself more and more drawn to sharing the Dharma with others. Christine has a thriving psychotherapy practice where she integrates the teachings of the Buddha and western psychology. She enjoys sharing with clients the benefits of meditation as well as helping to support them on their psychological/spiritual journeys. When not at work or meditating, Christine enjoys hiking, biking, running, and pretty much anything that involves movement and the outdoors. She loves spend ing time with her husband and friends, and her wonderful mini-husky Bodhi.

DATES: Wednesday evenings for 8 weeks on: 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24, 11/7, 11/14, & 11/28 (plus one Saturday intensive on 10/13, 9:00 am - 1:00 pm).

TIMES: 7:00-8:30pm

CLASS TEXT: "Eight Mindful Steps to Happiness"
by Bhante Gunaratana.
(NOTE: Please remember you can support PIMC by shopping on Amazon, at no extra cost to you. For instructions, please use this link: http://www.portlandinsight.org/giving#amazonsmile)

REQUESTED DONATION: $200 (No one is ever turned away from the class for lack of funds)

TO REGISTER: Please use the following link, https://secure.acceptiva.com/?cst=4b2157

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Please contact Gregory at, gregorymaloof@gmail.com
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"We say that the path is the most important element in the Buddha's
teaching because the path is what makes the Dhamma available to us
as a living experience. Without the path the Dhamma would just be a
shell, a collection of doctrines without inner life. Without the path, full
deliverance from suffering would become a mere dream. "
Bhikkhu Bodhi